Wyrd Daze Five: ’94 – ’95

Two new sonic paintings by
The Ephemeral Man

’94 – ’95:
Listen or Download

’94 – ’95 Mirrorverse:
Listen or Download

The early to mid-nineties were formative years for one particular incarnation of The Ephemeral Man. This time he was 19 & 20 years of age in ’94 – ’95. He’d already had his first ever psychedelic experience in ’92: an acid trip at an Orb gig. He’d left home at 18 to squat in an empty council house with a friend. When the Council finally kicked them out, he hitched to Luton to visit a friend who was there for Uni. In Luton he discovered Jungle and lost his virginity in an affair with a 33 year old woman with a thing for the film Bram Stoker’s Dracula (she wore a cloak). He also had some kind of transcendental experience whilst alone in a park reading a book about Shamanism; many things clicked into place that day, much of it indescribable. By ’94 he was back in Lincolnshire getting into all sorts of trouble, before moving from Sleaford to Boston to embark upon a college course in Popular Music (During one showcase evening open to the public, amongst all the indie bands, he performed a Jim Morrisonesque improvisation over strange electronic beats, accompanied by a TV festooned in Christmas lights showing René Laloux’s Fantastic Planet {hey blue girl, why so blue?} ). 1994 was the year of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act, which the UK government introduced in an attempt to crack down on the “anti-social behaviour” of people gathering together to explore shared experience through dancing, the taking of drugs and the exchanging of ideas and feelings.

All source material originally released in 1994/95

Ft. excerpts from Brainscan
directed by John Flynn
+ Strange Days
directed by Kathryn Bigelow

’94 – ’95

1 Atom Infant Incubator: Segment 0-1 
2 The Prodigy:
The Narcotic Suite: Claustrophobic Sting
3 Tricky: Aftermath
4 The Orb: Oxbow Lakes
5 The Future Sound of London:
Among Myselves
6 Mickey Finn: World Dance –
The Midsummer Dance Party (excerpt)
7 Aphex Twin: Cow Cud is a Twin
8 Slowdive: Miranda
9 Massive Attack: Protection
10 The Chemical Brothers:
Three Little Birdies Down Beat
11 Underworld: Cowgirl
12 Scanner: Mass Observation
13 Bjork: Possibly Maybe
14 Lisa Gerrard: The Rite
15 Depth Charge: Dead by Dawn
16 Nine Inch Nails: A Warm Place
17 Portishead: Roads
18 Steve Tibbetts: All for Nothing

’94 – ’95 Mirrorverse

1 Massive Attack: Weather Storm
2 Aphex Twin: Corrugated Tubing
3 Saint Etienne: Cool Kids of Death
4 The Prodigy: Break and Enter
5 Lisa Gerrard: Adjhon
6 The Future Sound of London: Ill Flower
7 Slowdive: Trellisaze
8 Portishead: Strangers
9 Bjork: The Modern Things
10 Deathprod: Treetop Drive 1
11 Tricky: Overcome
12 The Orb: Occidental
13 Scanner: Untitled (Mass Observation)
14 Tori Amos: Bells for Her
15 Blur: Girls and Boys (Ephemeral edit)
16 Telepathy: Steppin ’95
17 Leftfield: Black Flute
18 Experimental Audio Reasearch: D.M.T. Symphony (Overture to an Inhabited Zone)
19 Stereolab: Three-Dee Melodie

May induce altered states of consciousness…

Advertisements

Wyrd Daze Five : The Phoenix Guide to Strange England: Hookland

Wyrd Daze Five is live!
Best experienced with the PDF zine
which you can access here.

Elmsley

Hookland has a surfeit of quiet villages, almost managing to achieve their ambition of sleeping through the twentieth century. Among that number is Elmsley. Stretching in its slumber along the old market road that travels from the north of the county towards Hook, it is an unhurried dream of stone and timber cottages that ends in a mediaeval church and a shaded green.

However, like most of rural England, Elmsley’s peace and attempt at atemporality has been troubled by the invention of the automobile.
Fitful visits by motoring pioneers soon gave way to steady passage of tourers and eventually became the current harassment by traffic. It is also the car that gives the village both strange haunting and a most unusual byelaw.

At just after noon on Saturday, August 17th 1957, the cream and red Austin Westminster of Mr. Harvey Caldwell came towards Elmsley at near its top speed of 85 mph. Caldwell did not slow down as he approached the stone bridge marking the northern entrance to the village. In the harsh trajectory of predictable tragedy, the vehicle punched through one of the bridge’s walls and into the River Abna.

The Jordan family who were picnicking on the riverbank close to the bridge saw the Westminster claimed by the water. In testimony to the Coroner’s court,
Mr. John Jordan said: “My daughters and wife were shrieking as I ran towards the river.
I took off my shoes and jacket and dived in. With the mud and sediment thrown up
by the crash it was difficult to see anything.
I came up, filled my lungs and went back down and located the car.

The driver, a man I now know to be Harvey Caldwell, was slumped over the wheel, but the women – one in the passenger seat, one in the back – were pounding on the glass, trying to get out. I tried the doors repeatedly. They just would not open.

“I came up for air and went back down to try and smash the glass two more times, but gave up when the beating against the windows stopped. When I surfaced for the last time, all I could hear was a the sound of screaming. My wife, the girls, were
hysterical and had not gone for help.”

When the rescue services eventually retrieved the car from the river, it contained two bodies which the with police identified as Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell. There was no trace of the third occupant that John Jordan claimed to have seen. Despite intensive investigation, it was never established whether Jordan was mistaken and there was no other
passenger or whether the mysterious woman had managed to escape the drowning doom of the married couple she shared the car with.
Although the deaths were ruled as misadventure, no satisfactory
answer to why Caldwell was driving so fast has ever emerged. 

In the usual evolution of tragic event to ghost story, the tale would see the spot of accident haunted by the spirits of the Caldwells.
Yet, in the years that followed what has been reported is the sound of the still-living
Mrs. Jordan and her two daughters
screaming from the riverbank as temporal echo. The trauma cycle of witness refusing to be broken by the teeth of time.

The hearing of screaming became such a concern locally that the Parish Council, convinced it was the work of practical jokers, voted in a new byelaw. It prohibited: ‘Shrieking, screaming, screeching or crying in a way that suggests distress within sight of the riverbank or bridge at all times.’ Unfortunately, this unusual measure failed to prevent continued reports of the upsetting sound.  Even as recently as 1978, two German foreign-exchange students staying in the village who had no prior knowledge of the story. told their hosts that they had heard ‘hysterisch schreiend’ coming from an invisible source while walking along the Abna.

Although all of the Jordan family were reluctant to speak to the press or to investigators into psychic phenomena for many years, they temporally broke their silence after the Daily Mirror ran a tenth anniversary piece on odd accidents. The article had featured a recent picture of the bridge and riverside where the calamity had occurred. When reading it, Mr. Jordan, spotted a woman on the bridge looking towards the camera. He then contacted paper trying to find any details of who she was, claiming: “It was the woman in the back of the car. That face has haunted my fevers, my nightmares for a decade.
I know it was her.”

Mrs. Jordan also spoke publicly for the first time since the inquest into the deaths of the Caldwells, telling the Daily Mirror:
“I am thoroughly sick of people talking about my daughters and I as if we were some triad of banshees. I don’t believe any of this ghostly nonsense about a ‘scream spot’. I place the blame squarely on my husband for claiming we were hysterical. After 24 years of marriage I can tell you that he has always proven inadequate in dealing with emotion in others – whether it comes from shock of seeing a terrible accident unfold or his own daughters upset at their pet cat Arthur dying of old age.”

David Southwell is an author of several published books on true crime and
conspiracies, which have been translated into a dozen languages.

However, these days,
he mostly writes about place.

Creator of the @HooklandGuide

@Cultauthor

Wyrd Daze Five : ReVerse Butcher

Wyrd Daze Five is live!
Best experienced with the PDF zine
which you can access here.

ReVerse Butcher

Pair of Portraits (1/2) – Self Portrait (2017)
Ink, acrylic, gold leaf. 
Pair of Portraits (2/2) – Kylie Supski (2017)
Ink, acrylic, gold leaf. 

ReVerse Butcher is a multi-disciplinary artist with focuses in making unique artist’s books, collages, visual art, writing & performance. She will use any medium necessary to engage and subvert reality until it is less dull and oppressive. When she grows up she wants to be a well-read recluse. She currently lives in Melbourne, Australia.

ReVerse Butcher performing at COLLAGE live event 27/01/2019
photography by Kylie Supski 
ReVerse Butcher performing at COLLAGE live event 27/01/2019
photography by Kylie Supski 

“Here is a timelapse (2019) of ‘Songdom of God’. Used as live projections for COLLAGE (our live multimedia collage group). Made from cut up parts of the bible:”

“The Revenge” (appears in “Somewhere Dismembering”, Artists Book 2012.
Analogue collage, cut-up & erasure poetry)

When did poetry first find you and what was your reaction?

Poetry found me in my teens. It found me via music, theatre, and public libraries.
I had an early love for it.

Collaborative collage between ReVerse Butcher & Kylie Supski (2018)
“Black (W)hole Swallow”. Digital Collage, illustration, photography, calligram. 
   

When did you first begin expressing yourself with poetry
and how did it affect your life?

I started writing in my teens, which lead to attending local poetry readings. The way it most affected my life was finding a network of new things to read, listen to, go seek out.
It also put me in a strange position where the majority of my social group were, at minimum, 10 years older than me. I had clocked poetry as an excellent medium for disruption, because it was, at that time, largely unmediated. It seemed like the closest thing I could find to one of Hakim Bey’s “Temporary Autonomous Zones”. Nobody was watching, which meant anything could happen. So it also affected my early life in that it gave me a great playground to start experimenting & creating weird art.

I read in a previous interview that you used to sneak into open mic poetry nights at bars before you were of legal age. Can you tell us about some of your experiences around that time?

I started going to poetry readings when I was 17, so just before my 18th birthday. Some of them were in bars in afternoon sessions, a few in cafes later at night. I lived in a slightly isolated place at that time – so getting to and from some of these events was harder than gaining access! I wasn’t interested at all in drinking, so – as long as I didn’t approach the bar, or drink anything, I didn’t run into any trouble, and didn’t cause anyone any trouble.
I just wanted to listen, and perform.

“Here is the bandcamp for my spoken word/noise project,
called 
“Slow Process” (2014)”

“Our Lady of the Visionary Way” (2018)
 Analogue Collage, illustration, ink, acrylic, gold leaf.

Then you embarked upon your first international tour when you were 25 –
what was that like?

I wrote extensive journals during that period of my life. I have since burned the journals.
It was a thrilling & very isolating period of time. I learned a lot about misogyny first hand. But, as to specifics… what happens on the road, stays on the road. 

You work in a variety of mediums and enjoy collaboration:
what is it that drives you toward experimentation in this way?


Language is magical, it builds every aspect of our identities, world(s), control systems, relationships, power(s), as well as all the ways that we qualify and quantify how we know anything. Writing is slippery, it’s not native or static to any one form(at). My goal in my creative life is to break language. I want to see what happens to power, and consciousness, and the status quo when we shatter language.  What would different methodologies for building literally everything look like? What could we achieve, or feel, or learn, or share if we had access to something like that? This is why I will use any medium necessary to subvert reality until it is less dull and oppressive.

If you could collaborate with any person, living or dead, who would it be, why, and what would you do?

Your heroes will disappoint you every time. It’s a rule in life. Don’t have heroes, follow the lines of inquiry. But I’m collaborating with some pretty dreamboat people right about now! My partner in art and life Kylie Supski is my #1 favourite collaborator (so aren’t I lucky?). I’ve also got a pretty great line-up of regular collaborators at the moment, including Josh Pollock, Chris Wenn, COLLAGE (a multimedia group in Melbourne feat. Roger Alsop, Yoram Symons, Sophie Rose & others). I’m working on a collaborative accordion style artist’s book with James Knight at the moment called Discordion. Basically, if we are both on a similar line of inquiry (or ones that intersect in an interesting way), you are quite possibly that person. Get in touch.

“Bacterial Girl”, 2018. Digital Collage.

How would you describe your art?

A multi-modal, highly-focused, very-meticulous, total mess.

How would you describe your process?

An attempt to silence a barrel full of bees, 
drunk, with a hammer, under water

How would you describe yourself? 

What,today? Or yesterday? Future-ReV? Alternate reality ReV? ReV as she is to me?
To Her? Or to you? Different every time.

Would you say you are more structured or free-form in your creative process?

I create complex structure(s) to provide adequate containers for free-formed work.

Do you like your creative space cluttered or tidy? Do you work with quiet or music?

I like it organised. I don’t know if my definition matches either ‘cluttered’ or ‘tidy’.
It depends on the project, or what I need to make it. My computer files are meticulous, but I superglued my fingers to a desk last week, and I currently can’t get paint out of my purple wig. Make sense? Music always.

How would you describe your relationship with words, with language?

Symbiotic.

How would you describe your relationship with sound, with music?

Nebulous. What even qualifies as music? Is it a language too? Can I disrupt it? Can I paint it? Does it want me to? Yes.

How would you describe your relationship with image, with art?

Bold. Exciting. A brave & irreverent new voice raging against a culture of vapid mass-production. Multi-layered.

Is there a spiritual or mystical yearning in your work?

Yes

“The Whole Cut Up Woman”, 2018. Digital Collage.
Collaborative album “Osmosis” (2019)
Graphic score by ReVerse Butcher
Music interpreted, played and recorded by Josh Pollock.
(Listen)

To what extent does a sense of place affect your creativity?

I’ve learned that my best art is done in a place where I feel safe. That being said, I don’t really leave my house unless there is a very compelling reason.

Collaborative album “The Garbage Fire vs. The Fainting Couch” (2017)
 Graphic score by ReVerse Butcher. Music interpreted, played and recorded by Josh Pollock.
(It doesn’t have a ‘right way up’ – it can intentionally
be played/interpreted from any angle/direction)
(Listen)

Is there any specific connection or thread that runs between your works?

Disruption. Experimentation. A sense of playfulness. A sense of rebellion.
An invitation to join in or start your own.
I hope, a sense of joy. If not a sense of joy,
at least a touch of tough love.

Front Cover of “Wild Tongue Vol 2.” (2018)
Hand-painted artists book,
text a collage of lines from content from the zine.
Available from (Wild Tongue Zine)
 

How would you describe the art scene and culture in Melbourne to someone who has never been there?

Please don’t make me.
I have to live here right now.

I understand you’re working on a multimedia project called
“The Illuminated Manuscripts?”


Yes. It’s a giant spatial poem. Think an illuminated manuscript gone feral in Virtual Reality backed by a badass rock band. Think burning books that never ash. Think living bookworlds that are 40 feet above you, and 40 feet below you and you’re floating in space. Think a writhing glitterpoem the size of a football field. Live and recorded poets doing original works, breaking language, re-contextualising meaning, unwriting books, and remixing & collaging texts.

I’m starting to livestream the creative process of making all this on Twitch from
March 2019 (https://www.twitch.tv/reversebutcher).
Tune in if you’re into it.

“The 5th C” is a videopoem published 28th January at Burning House Press

 A timelapse of ‘A Visionary Outraged’ (2018), an erasure/collage poem

“Here is a v-log of me talking about altered books
(my own and that of Christine Strelan, Nimbin-based artist) in 2014.”

“Here is a track that I did guest vocals with band
“Third Sky”, called “Meow Inhibitor” (2011)”

Video of live performance from the 
“On The Rod, An Artists Book” launch in Nov 2018

pp. 20-21 from “On The Rod, An Artists Book” (2018)
Portrait of Circus the Interdimensional Prince(ss). 
pp. 116-117 from “On The Rod, An Artists Book” (2018)
Analogue collage, erasure & cut-up poem, ink, coloured pencil, acrylic, glue.
 
pp. 174-175 from “On The Rod, An Artists Book” (2018)
Portrait of Australian feminist poet, Liz Hall-Downs.

Illustration, ink, paper, glue, acrylic.   
pp. 206-207 from “On The Rod, An Artists Book” (2018)
Portrait of Kerry Loughrey. Ink, paper, glue, acrylic. 
 

What else are you working on in the moment?

1. An experimental multimedia production of John Cage’s “Lecture on Nothing“. 

2. COLLAGE happens LAST SUNDAY of the month at The Burrow in
Melbourne, until at least March.

3. An ongoing performance poetry/experimental music project with Chris Wenn.

4. ‘Pinhole Theory’, a collaborative collage chapbook with Kylie Supski.

5. ‘Mad Boy’ is my next solo long-form collage book, which scissors up
Gustav Flaubert’s  ‘Madame Bovary’
& Louise Colet’s ‘Lui: View of Him’.
Poets have been talking shit about each other since time began, but these two stand in for a very formidable oppressive patriarchal dynamic I’d like to attend to.

6. I’m working on live-streaming more of both the making and the performance of my analogue and digital art adventures so that I can engage with a diverse & international range of creative communities.

You’ll be able to see & support developments on ALL of these projects online.

Come check me out here: (https://www.twitch.tv/reversebutcher)

or come find me on twitter www.twitter.com/x_rVb_x

ReVerseButcher.com

Wyrd Daze Five : The Ephemeral Man

A sonic painting by
The Ephemeral Man

Listen / Download

All source material originally released in 1980

ft. excerpts from the film Altered States
by Ken Russell and Paddy Chayefsky,
with a score by John Paul Corigliano

also ft. the 1980 TV film adaptation of
Brave New World

1. Talking Heads : Once in a Lifetime    
2. Pascal Languirand : Abalii
3. The Sound : Missiles    
4. Cabaret Voltaire : Obsession
5. Asmus Tietchens : Erstes Nachtstück
6. John Foxx : Metal Beat
7. Joy Division : Atrocity Exhibition
8. Fad Gadget : Coitus Interruptus
9. Throbbing Gristle : Adrenalin
10. Bearns & Dexter : Golden Voyage
11. Queen : Flash Gordon soundtrack (excerpt)
12. Bauhaus : Spy in the Cab
13. Harry Bertoia : Swinging Bars
14. Ultravox : Vienna
15. Pascal Languirand : O Nos Omnes
16. Peter Gabriel : Games Without Frontiers

Listen / Download

Ephicons